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Simply180 to Premiere Acclaimed Documentary A Plastic Ocean at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center on Earth Day, April 22 ... - Yahoo Finance

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Mon, 04/10/2017 - 01:35

Simply180 to Premiere Acclaimed Documentary A Plastic Ocean at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center on Earth Day, April 22 ...
Yahoo Finance
Human exposure to these chemicals has been suggested to contribute to some cancers, and infertility, as well as immune, metabolic, cognitive and behavioral disorders. The feature-length documentary, A Plastic Ocean, follows a team of international team ...

On this day: April 10 - KTVZ

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 04/09/2017 - 19:05

KTVZ

On this day: April 10
KTVZ
2010: Actress Dixie Carter, best known for her role as Julia Sugarbaker in the sitcom "Designing Women," dies of endometrial cancer at the age of 70 in Houston, Texas. Carter was also known for her TV roles on the legal drama "Family Law," the soap ...

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Emma Betts, Dear Melanoma cancer campaigner, dies - The Australian

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 04/09/2017 - 12:29

The Australian

Emma Betts, Dear Melanoma cancer campaigner, dies
The Australian
Emma Betts, a young Queensland woman who forged a community of thousands as she documented her battle with terminal cancer, has died aged 25.

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British foreign correspondent Cornwell dies of cancer at 71 - Press Herald

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 04/09/2017 - 11:48

British foreign correspondent Cornwell dies of cancer at 71
Press Herald
But Pearl Harbor happened on a remote Pacific island, not at the very nerve centers of U.S. government and business. And just like the Japanese attack on Hawaii, this was an act of war – but a war conducted by unseen assassins, who have inflicted a ...

Veterans Journal: World War II film's world premiere May 27 at The Vets Auditorium in Providence - The Providence Journal

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 04/09/2017 - 11:05

The Providence Journal

Veterans Journal: World War II film's world premiere May 27 at The Vets Auditorium in Providence
The Providence Journal
The film is narrated by five-time Super Bowl-winning New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick, whose father Steve served in World War II in the U.S. Navy in both Europe and the Pacific and coached football at the Naval Academy in Annapolis for ...

Compound May Help Prevent Neuron Damage in Age-Related Diseases - PsychCentral.com

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 04/09/2017 - 02:03

Xinhua

Compound May Help Prevent Neuron Damage in Age-Related Diseases
PsychCentral.com
“The increase in cellular senescence associated with aging, and the inflammation associated with that, can help set the stage for a wide variety of degenerative disease, including cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and neurologic disease, such as ...
New finding about rapamycin may help slow agingXinhua

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New finding about rapamycin may help slow aging - Xinhua ... - Xinhua

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sat, 04/08/2017 - 10:53

Xinhua

New finding about rapamycin may help slow aging - Xinhua ...
Xinhua
SAN FRANCISCO, April 8 (Xinhua) -- A study outlines a new understanding of how a compound called rapamycin works that may help address neurologic ...

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Rupert Cornwell, British journalist who covered financial intrigue, politics and 9/11 attacks, dies at 71 - Washington Post

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 04/07/2017 - 11:07

Washington Post

Rupert Cornwell, British journalist who covered financial intrigue, politics and 9/11 attacks, dies at 71
Washington Post
The cause was colon cancer, said his wife, Susan Cornwell, a journalist with the Reuters news agency. Mr. Cornwell ... But Pearl Harbor happened on a remote Pacific island, not at the very nerve centres of US government and business. And just like the ...

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Natural compound may help fight Alzheimers disease - The Statesman

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Thu, 04/06/2017 - 21:00

The Statesman

Natural compound may help fight Alzheimers disease
The Statesman
"The increase in cellular senescence associated with ageing, and the inflammation associated with that, can help set the stage for a wide variety of degenerative diseases, including cancer, heart disease, diabetes and neurologic disease, such as ...

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On this day: April 7 - KTVZ

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Thu, 04/06/2017 - 19:05

KTVZ

On this day: April 7
KTVZ
Based on James A. Michener's Pulitzer Prize-winning 1947 book "Tales of the South Pacific," it was an immediate hit, running for 1,925 performances and winning 10 Tony Awards, including Best Musical, Best Score and Best Libretto. It also became ...

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The one question I wish I could have asked my grandfather - The Sydney Morning Herald

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Thu, 04/06/2017 - 15:38

The Sydney Morning Herald

The one question I wish I could have asked my grandfather
The Sydney Morning Herald
If one of his older brothers was waiting at the school gate it could only mean one thing: the family had moved again. His mother was like that. Burdened by a long dead husband and a brood of nine hungry children, she'd made it her mission to stay one ...

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Virginia Mason Recognized by Healthgrades for Outstanding Patient Experience for Fifth Consecutive Year - State of Reform

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Thu, 04/06/2017 - 12:05

State of Reform

Virginia Mason Recognized by Healthgrades for Outstanding Patient Experience for Fifth Consecutive Year
State of Reform
Virginia Mason is the only hospital in the Pacific Northwest* to receive the America's 50 Best Hospitals and Outstanding Patient Experience awards from Healthgrades in 2017. ... Benaroya Research Institute, which is internationally recognized for ...

On the Front Lines of India's Rhino Wars - Pacific Standard

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Thu, 04/06/2017 - 12:01

Pacific Standard

On the Front Lines of India's Rhino Wars
Pacific Standard
According to the IUCN, “any catastrophic event in Kaziranga (such as disease, civil disorder, poaching, habitat loss, etc.) would have a devastating impact on the status of this species.” One of those threats is ever-present. Aron White, a wildlife ...

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Study helps explain varying outcomes for cancer, Down Syndrome

MIT Cancer Research RSS - Thu, 04/06/2017 - 05:00

Aneuploidy is a condition in which cells contain an abnormal number of chromosomes, and is known to be the cause of many types of cancer and genetic disorders, including Down Syndrome. The condition is also the leading cause of miscarriage.

Disorders caused by aneuploidy are unusual in that the severity of their effects often varies widely from one individual to another.

For example, nearly 90 percent of fetuses with three copies of chromosome 21, the cause of Down Syndrome, will miscarry before birth. In other cases, people with the condition will live until they are over 60 years old.

Researchers have previously believed that this variation is the result of differences in the genetic makeup of those individuals with the condition.

But in a paper published today in the journal Cell, researchers at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT reveal that aneuploidy alone can cause this significant variability in traits, in otherwise genetically identical cells.

The finding could have significant implications for cancer treatment, since it could explain why genetically identical cancer cells may respond differently to the same therapy.

An immediate impact

Aneuploidy originates during cell division, when the chromosomes do not separate properly or are not equally partitioned between the two daughter cells. This leads the cells, which in humans would normally have 46 chromosomes, to develop with either too many or too few chromosomes.

To study the effects of the condition, the researchers induced either chromosome loss or gain in genetically identical baker’s yeast cells. They chose baker’s yeast because the cells behave in a very similar way to human cells, according to Angelika Amon, the Kathleen and Curtis Marble Professor of Cancer Research and a member of the Koch Institute.

The induced changes had an immediate impact on the cells.

“We induced aneuploidy, and we found that the response was very variable from cell to cell,” Amon says. “Some cells slowed down their cycle completely, so that they could no longer divide, whereas others kept dividing quite normally and only experienced a small effect.”

The researchers carried out a systematic analysis, investigating the effect on the cells of gaining or losing a variety of different chromosomes. They found that in each case, even though individual cells had gained or lost the same chromosome, they behaved very differently from each other.

“So that really suggested that every single chromosome gained or lost had this effect, in that the responses (in each case) were quite variable,” Amon says.

Beyond cell division

The researchers also investigated the impact of aneuploidy on other biological pathways, such as transcription, the first stage of gene expression in which a segment of DNA is copied into RNA.

They found that here too, the effects of aneuploidy were varied across otherwise identical cells.

The cells’ response to environmental changes also varied considerably, suggesting that aneuploidy has an impact on the robustness of many, if not all, biological processes.

To ensure the response is not an effect that is unique to baker’s yeast cells, the researchers then studied the impact of aneuploidy on mice, and found the same levels of variability, Amon says.

“This suggests that the aneuploidy state itself could create variability, and that could provide an additional explanation of why diseases that are caused by aneuploidy are so variable,” Amon says.

Tumors, for example, are known to contain different populations of cells, some of which are quite different to each other in their genetic makeup. These genetic differences have often been blamed when chemotherapy or other treatments have been unsuccessful, as it was believed that the therapy may not have targeted all of the cells within the tumor.

“Unfortunately our paper suggests that tumors don’t even need to be heterogeneous genetically, the very fact that they have aneuploidy could lead to very variable outcomes, and that represents a significant challenge for cancer therapy,” Amon says.

Understanding the consequences of aneuploidy on cellular phenotypes is a fundamental question that has important implications for the treatment of several diseases, such as cancer and Down Syndrome, according to Giulia Rancati of the Institute of Medical Biology at the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) in Singapore, who was not involved in the research.

“This new exciting work adds an additional layer of understanding of how aneuploidy causes phenotypic variation, by revealing an unexpectedly high cell-to-cell variability between cells harboring the same aneuploidy karyotype,” Rancati says. “It would be interesting to test if this property of the aneuploid state might positively contribute to the evolution of cancer cells, which are known to develop drug resistance at high frequency.”

The researchers are now hoping to carry out further studies to investigate the origins of the variability, Amon says.

The results suggest that subtle changes in gene dosage across many genes, caused by the change in chromosome numbers, can promote alternate behaviors.

“We’re now trying to track down which the key genes are, and which the key pathways are,” she says. “Once we can understand what the key pathways are that cause this variability, we can start to think about targeting those pathways, to combat alternate outcomes in cancer treatment, for example.”

Categories: Cancer Research

Researchers find natural compound to help fight Alzheimer's - Zee News

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 23:58

Zee News

Researchers find natural compound to help fight Alzheimer's
Zee News
"The increase in cellular senescence associated with ageing, and the inflammation associated with that, can help set the stage for a wide variety of degenerative diseases, including cancer, heart disease, diabetes and neurologic disease, such as ...

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Patricia Solano dies - Register Pajaronian

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 14:47

Patricia Solano dies
Register Pajaronian
WATSONVILLE — Patricia Gospodnetich Solano, a lifelong Watsonville resident who raised five children and variously worked as a teacher, a telephone operator and a legal secretary, died Monday after an illness. She was 78. ... Her parents came from ...

Survivors, caregivers support meeting - Saipan Tribune

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 10:13

Survivors, caregivers support meeting
Saipan Tribune
All people facing cancer, their family members, and caregivers are invited to the next Commonwealth Cancer Association, Inc. support meeting on Thursday, April 6, 2017, starting at 5:30pm at Hyatt Regency Saipan's Giovanni's Room. Guest speaker is Dr ...

OSU study: Compound may help slow Alzheimer's - KTVZ

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 07:36

OSU study: Compound may help slow Alzheimer's
KTVZ
“The increase in cellular senescence associated with aging, and the inflammation associated with that, can help set the stage for a wide variety of degenerative disease, including cancer, heart disease, diabetes and neurologic disease, such as dementia ...

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New function discovered for compound that may help slow aging ... - Science Daily

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 06:50

New function discovered for compound that may help slow aging ...
Science Daily
Researchers have found that a compound called rapamycin has unusual properties that may help address neurologic damage such as Alzheimer's disease, and ...

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Veterans support aid for radiation, Agent Orange exposure - The Guam Daily Post (press release) (registration)

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 06:10

Veterans support aid for radiation, Agent Orange exposure
The Guam Daily Post (press release) (registration)
The measure funds the medical expenses of such veterans who suffer from cancers and other diseases connected to the exposure of radiation from nuclear testing. Atomic Act advocate Robert Celestial, a military veteran, sat alongside Jose Garrido and ...

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