Feed aggregator

On this day: April 5 - KTVZ

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Tue, 04/04/2017 - 19:05

KTVZ

On this day: April 5
KTVZ
2010: Twenty-nine coal miners are killed in an explosion at the Upper Big Branch Mine in Raleigh County, West Virginia. The Mine Safety and Health Administration eventually concluded that flagrant safety violations contributed to a coal dust explosion ...

and more »

The Fishermen Chronicles - Muscat Daily

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Tue, 04/04/2017 - 18:10

Muscat Daily

The Fishermen Chronicles
Muscat Daily
A camera crew working on the new four-part show Big Pacific - which is to start screening across the globe this summer - filmed as the coastguards they were with gave chase. “The illegal fishermen fled and crashed into the shore, abandoning ... The ...

BUSINESS IN BRIEF 5/4 - VietNamNet Bridge

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Tue, 04/04/2017 - 15:31

VietNamNet Bridge

BUSINESS IN BRIEF 5/4
VietNamNet Bridge
Phu Quoc Island is emerging as a phenomenon in Viet Nam's property market with investment worth billions of dollars from large developers, helping draw a slew of investors and buyers looking for investment properties. The island off the coast of ...

and more »

Ali Lowe, Manly Daily - dailytelegraph.com.au

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Tue, 04/04/2017 - 13:37

dailytelegraph.com.au

Ali Lowe, Manly Daily
dailytelegraph.com.au
We've donated $2250 to Fight on the Beaches, $1000 to ovarian cancer and $1000 to Lions prostate cancer fundraising. Tony Philips in his Lions Club shirt at Narrabeen. Picture: David Swift. The Australian Lions Children's ... Another thing we do is ...

DLNR's Seman passes away - Saipan Tribune

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Tue, 04/04/2017 - 09:09

Saipan Tribune

DLNR's Seman passes away
Saipan Tribune
Seman was also an active member of several boards such as the Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council and president of the CNMI Fisherman's Marketing Association. He was also an amateur ... Guerrero said he didn't know that Monday's ...

and more »

Method may help myeloma patients avoid painful biopsies

MIT Cancer Research RSS - Mon, 04/03/2017 - 22:00

Multiple myeloma is a cancer of the plasma cells, which are white blood cells produced in bone marrow that churn out antibodies to help fight infection. When plasma cells become cancerous, they produce abnormal proteins, and the cells can build up in bone marrow, ultimately seeping into the bloodstream.

The disease is typically diagnosed through a bone marrow biopsy, in which a needle is inserted near a patient’s hip bone to suck out a sample of bone marrow — a painful process for many patients. Clinicians can then isolate and analyze the plasma cells in the bone marrow sample to determine if they are cancerous.

There is currently no way to easily detect plasma cells that have escaped into the bloodstream. Circulating plasma cells are not normally found in healthy people, and the ability to detect these cells in blood could enable doctors to diagnose and track the progression of multiple myeloma.

Now engineers at MIT have devised a microfluidic technique to capture and count circulating plasma cells from small samples of blood. The technique, which relies on conventional blood draws, may provide patients with a less painful test for multiple myeloma.

“Procedures of the traditional tissue biopsy are painful, associated with complications such as potential infections, and often available only in central hospitals which require patients to travel long distances,” says former MIT postdoc Mohammad Qasaimeh. “Capturing plasma cells from blood samples can serve as a liquid biopsy, which can be performed in clinics as often as required, and serve as a diagnostic and prognostic test during and after chemotherapy treatment. Moreover, captured cells can be used for drug testing and thus serve as a tool for personalized medicine.”

Qasaimeh and his colleagues have published their results today in the journal Scientific Reports. His co-authors include Rohit Karnik, an associate professor in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering; Yichao Wu and Suman Bose, both former students; Jeffrey Karp, an associate professor in the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology; and Rao Prabhala, an instructor in medicine at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School.

A herringbone trap

The group’s technique builds on a microfluidic design that was previously developed by George Whitesides, a professor of chemistry at Harvard University. Whitesides and his colleagues fabricated a small microchip, the channel of which they etched with repeating, V-shaped grooves, similar to a herringbone pattern. The grooves cause any fluid flowing through the microchip to swirl about in eddies, rather passing straight through. The cells within the fluid therefore have a higher chance of making contact with the floor of the device, as first shown by Memhmet Toner at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Researchers including Karnik have since reproduced this microfluidic design, coating the microchip’s floor with certain molecules to attract cells of interest. 

In its latest work, Karnik’s team used the microfluidic herringbone design to capture circulating plasma cells. They coated the channels of a microchip, about the size of a glass slide, with CD138, an antibody that is also expressed on the membranes of plasma cells. The team then flowed small, 1-milliliter samples of blood through the device. The herringbone grooves circulated the blood in the microfluidic channels, where the antibodies, acting as tiny Velcro pads, grabbed onto any passing plasma cells while letting the rest of the blood flow out of the device.

Once the cells were isolated in the microchip, the researchers could count the cells, as well determine the kinds of antibodies that each cell secretes.

“With the ease of a blood draw”

The researchers tested the device using blood samples from healthy donors as well as patients with the disease. After counting the number of cells captured in each sample, they observed very low numbers of circulating plasma cells in healthy samples — about two to five cells per milliliter of blood — versus substantially higher counts in patients diagnosed with multiple myeloma, of about 45 to 184 cells per milliliter.

The team also analyzed the captured plasma cells to determine the type of antibodies they produced. Plasma cells can generate one of two kinds of antibodies, known as kappa- and lambda-type. In addition to conducting bone marrow biopsies, clinicians can analyze blood samples for the ratio of these two antibodies, which can be an indicator of how the disease is progressing.

Karnik and his colleagues determined the ratio of plasma cells producing kappa- and lambda-type antibodies, and compared them to conventional blood tests for the same antibodies, for both healthy subjects and patients with multiple myeloma. Encouragingly, they found both sets of results matched, validating the microfluidic device’s accuracy. 

Surprisingly, the team noted that patients who were in remission exhibited higher counts of circulating plasma cells than healthy donors. These same patients had shown normal ratios of antibodies in conventional blood tests. Karnik says that the group’s new device may reveal more subtle information about a patient’s state, even in remission.

“When patients go into remission, their antibody levels can look normal,” Karnik says. “But we detect a level of circulating plasma cells that is above the baseline. It’s hard to tell whether these cells are cancerous, but at least this technique is giving us more information. With the ease of a blood draw, this may enable us to track cancer in a much better way.”

Karnik adds that in the future, researchers may use the group’s design to perform genetic tests on the captured cells, or to look for mutations in the cells that may further characterize the disease.

“We can capture and stain these cells in the device, which opens the possibility of studying whether there are new mutations in the cells,” Karnik says. “With cancers like multiple myeloma, even for patients in remission, cancer can recur. Detecting the level or mutation of plasma cells in blood might provide an early detection method for these patients.”

This research was supported, in part, by the National Institutes of Health and the Al Jalila Foundation.

Categories: Cancer Research

Council greenlights $1.6M gas station purchase - Union Democrat

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Mon, 04/03/2017 - 17:02

Union Democrat

Council greenlights $1.6M gas station purchase
Union Democrat
Expect to see construction beginning this summer at Greenley Road and Mono Way for long-planned improvements to widen the intersection ahead of the opening of a new multi-million-dollar cancer center on the northeast corner. The Sonora City Council met ...

and more »

Island Snapshots – April 2017 - Saipan Tribune

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Mon, 04/03/2017 - 01:23

Island Snapshots – April 2017
Saipan Tribune
MMAC TITLE SPONSORS 2017 Marianas March Against Cancer Committee members and Commonwealth Cancer Association executive director Juan L. Babauta with one of this year's Title Sponsors, Hyatt Regency Saipan. MMAC would like to ... SUPPORTING RED CROSS ...

Album: Mount Eerie — A Crow Looked at Me - The Mancunion

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 04/02/2017 - 23:09

The Mancunion

Album: Mount Eerie — A Crow Looked at Me
The Mancunion
This is bolstered, no doubt, by the fact that he lives on an island in the Pacific Northwest that is overlooked by the real Mount Eerie. Relatively publicity-shy, for a six-month period in early 2016 he communicated almost exclusively ... Resist big ...

Hunter Morning News | Monday, April 3, 2017 - The Maitland Mercury

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 04/02/2017 - 13:55

The Maitland Mercury

Hunter Morning News | Monday, April 3, 2017
The Maitland Mercury
The 43-year-old was diagnosed with breast cancer one year ago. In January she was told it had spread to ... ▻CANBERRA: Organisers of the Indian Pacific Wheel Race have cancelled the cross-country cycling race after a rider was killed in a collision ...

Blockbuster nature series catches Filipino dynamite fishermen on film - ABS-CBN News

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 04/02/2017 - 12:33

ABS-CBN News

Blockbuster nature series catches Filipino dynamite fishermen on film
ABS-CBN News
A camera crew working on the new four-part show "Big Pacific" -- which is to start screening across the globe this summer -- filmed as the coastguards they were with gave chase. "The illegal fishermen fled and crashed into the shore, ... The ...

and more »

Advocate hopes for Guam survivors of US nuclear bomb tests to receive help - The Guam Daily Post (press release) (registration)

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 04/02/2017 - 06:17

The Guam Daily Post (press release) (registration)

Advocate hopes for Guam survivors of US nuclear bomb tests to receive help
The Guam Daily Post (press release) (registration)
"He had so many diseases: kidney failure, diabetes, spinal cancer. I know there are others from Guam who helped with the cleanup process. I hope they'll come to the public hearing on Tuesday." Celestial said he came back to Guam in 1992 after living in ...

Globe-trotting pollutants pose a larger threat to public health than previously thought - PRI

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 04/02/2017 - 05:03

PRI

Globe-trotting pollutants pose a larger threat to public health than previously thought
PRI
Simonich's research group at Oregon State University has been primarily studying how PAHs get transported across the Pacific Ocean to the US West Coast from “source regions,” like Asia. They try to measure how much PAH in the US is ... Polycyclic ...

and more »

From the archives: With quiet desperation, Tim Powers' suicide puzzled those close to him - Omaha World-Herald (blog)

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sat, 04/01/2017 - 16:03

Omaha World-Herald (blog)

From the archives: With quiet desperation, Tim Powers' suicide puzzled those close to him
Omaha World-Herald (blog)
Tim Powers' father operated "Powers' Country Store" in Rock Island long before Creighton University alumni and fans would know Tim as a basketball star. When Tim was 15, his 18-year-old brother, Tom, was working in the store. .... Tim and Claudia ...

and more »

New pill considered key in the fight against ageing - New Zealand Herald

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sat, 04/01/2017 - 12:39

New pill considered key in the fight against ageing
New Zealand Herald
NAD is crucial in fuelling the seven different genes in our body that govern ageing. However, our NAD levels decline by about 50 per cent as we age, turning off the body's defences against ageing and age-related diseases such as cancer, diabetes, heart ...

and more »

Largely white opioid epidemic highlights black frustration - Island Packet

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sat, 04/01/2017 - 02:48

Island Packet

Largely white opioid epidemic highlights black frustration
Island Packet
Premature deaths for African-American, Hispanic and Asian and Pacific Islanders continued to decline. Drug overdoses, suicide and liver disease are stoking the alarming rise in premature accidental white deaths, as well as among American Indians and ...

and more »

Sandra “Sandy” Eleanore Palmisani | 1949 - 2017 - Islands' Weekly

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 03/31/2017 - 12:16

Islands' Weekly

Sandra “Sandy” Eleanore Palmisani | 1949 - 2017
Islands' Weekly
As a civil service engineer Fred moved the family to live on the west coast, east coast and most notably, the Marshall Islands in the equatorial western Pacific. Sandy and her brothers spent 3 years swimming in the lagoon at Kwajalein Atoll, and ...

Satire, free speech and Mehdi Savari - The Saturday Paper (subscription)

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 03/31/2017 - 09:54

The Saturday Paper (subscription)

Satire, free speech and Mehdi Savari
The Saturday Paper (subscription)
My gut lurched when I heard there was a stand-up comedian being held on Manus Island. Mehdi Savari is not much older than I am. He put his life at risk ... I agree with Sami: “To expect satire to change anything is like asking a Band-Aid to cure cancer ...

In search of the American experience - Irish Times

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Thu, 03/30/2017 - 02:55

Irish Times

In search of the American experience
Irish Times
We roamed America in an RV (a 14-metre bus) which I bought on the cheap from an elderly couple whose retirement was truncated by the husband's terminal illness. We met the couple along the .... She will forever remind me of one of those provocative ...

Padres' Seidler fuels new push on homelessness … by day and dark of night - MyAJC

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Wed, 03/29/2017 - 23:08

MyAJC

Padres' Seidler fuels new push on homelessness … by day and dark of night
MyAJC
The Human Services Campus, tucked along an arm of the Southern Pacific railway near downtown's warehouse district, seems dreary and unapproachable in name only. The biggest shelter and assessment tool for homeless in Arizona, a $24 million ...

and more »
Syndicate content