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On this day: February 20 - Channel3000.com - WISC-TV3

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Mon, 02/20/2017 - 05:37

Channel3000.com - WISC-TV3

On this day: February 20
Channel3000.com - WISC-TV3
2005: Actress Sandra Dee, known for her wholesome ingenue roles in such 1960s films as "The Reluctant Debutante," "Gidget," "Imitation of Life" and "A Summer Place," dies of complications from kidney disease at the age of 62 in Thousand Oaks ...

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John Pilger on the US threat to world peace — and Australia's choice - Green Left Weekly

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 02/19/2017 - 17:10

Green Left Weekly

John Pilger on the US threat to world peace — and Australia's choice
Green Left Weekly
After a sold out Melbourne screening of his latest master class in documentary filmmaking, The Coming War on China (his 60th film for ITV), Pilger is stark when speaking with Green Left Weekly: Undeniably, he insists, US island bases surround China ...

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Meet 'Zealandia,' Earth's Newest Continent - Science Times

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 02/19/2017 - 04:47

Science Times

Meet 'Zealandia,' Earth's Newest Continent
Science Times
... beneath New Zealand and New Caledonia. Scientists have long been eyeing a huge landmass which is about 94 percent submerged under the Pacific Ocean which they have named as "Zealandia." ... Can Nutella Really Cause Cancer? Here's What You Should ...
Scientists may have proven the existence of a new continentIrish Times

all 226 news articles »

Exhibit for cultural artefacts: Pride of Fiji - Fiji Times

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sat, 02/18/2017 - 11:07

Fiji Times

Exhibit for cultural artefacts: Pride of Fiji
Fiji Times
HOOPER: My grandfather James Hooper worked until he was 60 for the Thames River Authority in the London area, but since he was a boy, before World War I (1914-18), he was fascinated by far-away places, especially the Pacific Islands. So as a childhood ...

Scene: Symphony Ball spends night inVienna - The Morning Call - Allentown Morning Call

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 02/17/2017 - 15:41

Allentown Morning Call

Scene: Symphony Ball spends night inVienna - The Morning Call
Allentown Morning Call
PHOTO GALLERY: The Allentown Symphony Association created a bit of a what it might feel like to spend an “Enchanted Evening in Vienna” for its 67th annual ...

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Trash and toxins found in the most remote corner of the ocean - WCAI

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 02/17/2017 - 08:34

Trash and toxins found in the most remote corner of the ocean
WCAI
Recent tests on shrimp-like crustaceans that live more than six miles below the surface of the Pacific Ocean in the Mariana Trench show high levels of long-banned, cancer-causing pollutants in their bodies. "We still think of the deep ocean as being ...

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Scientists may have proven the existence of a new continent - Irish Times

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 02/17/2017 - 04:19

Irish Times

Scientists may have proven the existence of a new continent
Irish Times
Zealandia - a land mass submerged in the southwest Pacific - is a step closer to being recognised as a continent, the authors of a new scientific paper claim. A paper published in GSA Today, the journal of the Geological Society of America, contends ...

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Death in the Water: How Plastic Is Poisoning Our Oceans - Earth911.com

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 02/17/2017 - 03:36

Earth911.com

Death in the Water: How Plastic Is Poisoning Our Oceans
Earth911.com
Though the term “garbage patch” brings to mind the image of a large floating island of trash, it's actually a bit of a misnomer. The lion's share of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch is composed of extremely high concentrations of plastic debris ...

Martin Butler Tanna Liz Jackson Oscar - The Australian - The Australian

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 02/17/2017 - 02:02

The Australian

Martin Butler Tanna Liz Jackson Oscar - The Australian
The Australian
Martin Butler speaks with the sandpapery growl of a lifelong smoker, which is a little misleading because he kicked the habit a decade ago as he reached his ...

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Vera Gorbunova delivers eighth Paul F. Glenn Lecture

MIT Cancer Research RSS - Thu, 02/16/2017 - 11:00

Mice and rats rarely live more than five years. Yet some rodents, remarkably, can live up to 30. These notably long-lived rodents were the subject of Vera Gorbunova’s “Longevity and anticancer mechanisms in long-lived rodents,” the eighth annual Paul F. Glenn Distinguished Lecture on Feb. 7. The Department of Biology hosted the event at the MIT Stata Center.   

An expert on aging, the focus for this lecture series, Gorbunova is the Doris Johns Cherry Endowed Professor of Biology and Co-Director of the Rochester Aging Research Center at the University of Rochester. Her lecture described research performed in her laboratory on a variety of long-lived rodents, including both the naked mole rat and the blind mole rat, and the mechanisms by which they avoid cancer and regulate aging. It was a tale of careful experimentation and curious observations. As one example, when studying the very long-lived and cancer resistant naked mole rat, she made the serendipitous discovery that when cells from naked mole rats are grown in culture, the culture medium becomes viscous. That viscosity turns out to be caused by an especially large form of the sugar molecule hyaluronan. Through a series of elegant experiments, Gorbunova showed that hyaluronan was the key to the cancer resistance seen in naked mole rats.

Gorbunova trained as a biologist at different institutions around the world. She was an undergraduate biology major at St. Petersburg State University in St. Petersburg, Russia, and a graduate student in plant genetics at the Weizmann Institute in Rehovat, Israel. She was a postdoc with Siegfried Hekimi at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, and with both Olivia M. Pereira-Smith and John Wilson at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

Gorbunova has received a number of prizes for her work, including a 2010 Glenn Foundation Award for Research in Biological Mechanisms of Aging, the 2013 ADPS/Allianz Longevity Research Prize (France), the 2014 Prince Hitachi Prize in Comparative Oncology, and the 2014 Davey Prize in Cancer Research.

As a prelude to the talk, Mark Collins, president and director of the Glenn Foundation, spoke about the foundation’s long interest in aging research, which it has been funding since 1965, when severe caloric restriction was the only thing known to increase lifespan. In addition to pointing out that Gorbunova was a recipient of a Glenn Foundation research award, he noted the passing of MIT Professor Susan Lindquist, who had served on the Glenn Foundation scientific advisory board.

The Glenn Foundation has made significant contributions to aging research at MIT over the last decade. In 2008, the Paul F. Glenn Laboratory for Science of Aging Research was established through a $5 million gift from the foundation and expanded with an additional $1 million gift in 2013. More recently, a $2 million gift in 2015 led to the formation of the Paul F. Glenn Center for Science of Aging Research at MIT, directed by Novartis Professor of Biology Leonard Guarente. Li-Huei Tsai, director of the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at MIT, and Angelika Amon, the Kathleen and Curtis Marble Professor in Cancer Research, also conduct research as part of the center. 

Guarente introduced both Collins and Gorbunova, and invited the audience to join them for a reception held in the Koch Biology Building after the lecture.

Categories: Cancer Research

Saipan to host regional health meeting in March - Marianas Variety

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Thu, 02/16/2017 - 06:45

Saipan to host regional health meeting in March
Marianas Variety
SAIPAN will host the 61st Pacific Islands Health Officers Association or PIHOA executive board meeting from March 27-31, 2017. The meeting will bring together PIHOA executives, ... Can the body as one of the recommendation of the group AGREE to support ...

InComm Canada Named 'Vendor of the Year' by North West Company - Montreal Gazette

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Thu, 02/16/2017 - 03:45

InComm Canada Named 'Vendor of the Year' by North West Company
Montreal Gazette
The North West Company – a leading retailer of food and everyday needs for rural and urban neighborhoods across Canada, rural Alaska, the South Pacific islands and the Caribbean – works with more than 300 active general merchandise vendors. InComm ...

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Putting data in the hands of doctors

MIT Cancer Research RSS - Wed, 02/15/2017 - 18:00

Regina Barzilay is working with MIT students and medical doctors in an ambitious bid to revolutionize cancer care. She is relying on a tool largely unrecognized in the oncology world but deeply familiar to hers: machine learning. 

Barzilay, the Delta Electronics Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2014. She soon learned that good data about the disease is hard to find. “You are desperate for information — for data,” she says now. “Should I use this drug or that? Is that treatment best? What are the odds of recurrence? Without reliable empirical evidence, your treatment choices become your own best guesses.”

Across different areas of cancer care — be it diagnosis, treatment, or prevention — the data protocol is similar. Doctors start the process by mapping patient information into structured data by hand, and then run basic statistical analyses to identify correlations. The approach is primitive compared with what is possible in computer science today, Barzilay says.

These kinds of delays and lapses (which are not limited to cancer treatment), can really hamper scientific advances, Barzilay says. For example, 1.7 million people are diagnosed with cancer in the U.S. every year, but only about 3 percent enroll in clinical trials, according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Current research practice relies exclusively on data drawn from this tiny fraction of patients. “We need treatment insights from the other 97 percent receiving cancer care,” she says.

To be clear: Barzilay isn’t looking to up-end the way current clinical research is conducted. She just believes that doctors and biologists — and patients — could benefit if she and other data scientists lent them a helping hand. Innovation is needed and the tools are there to be used.

Barzilay has struck up new research collaborations, drawn in MIT students, launched projects with doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital, and begun empowering cancer treatment with the machine learning insight that has already transformed so many areas of modern life.

Machine learning, real people

At the MIT Stata Center, Barzilay, a lively presence, interrupts herself mid-sentence, leaps up from her office couch, and runs off to check on her students.

She returns with a laugh. An undergraduate group is assisting Barzilay with a federal grant application, and they’re down to the wire on the submission deadline. The funds, she says, would enable her to pay the students for their time. Like Barzilay, they are doing much of this research for free, because they believe in its power to do good. “In all my years at MIT I have never seen students get so excited about the research and volunteer so much of their time,” Barzilay says.

At the center of Barzilay’s project is machine learning, or algorithms that learn from data and find insights without being explicitly programmed where to look for them. This tool, just like the ones Amazon, Netflix, and other sites use to track and predict your preferences as a consumer, can make short work of gaining insight into massive quantities of data.

Applying it to patient data can offer tremendous assistance to people who, as Barzilay knows well, really need the help. Today, she says, a woman cannot retrieve answers to simple questions such as: What was the disease progression for women in my age range with the same tumor characteristics?

What a machine can see

Working closely with collaborators Taghian Alphonse, chief of breast radiation oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH); Kevin Hughes, co-director of the Avon Comprehensive Breast Evaluation Center at MGH; and Constance Lehman, the chief of the breast imaging division at MGH, Barzilay intends to bring data science into clinical research nationwide. But first, she’s content with connecting her world with theirs.

Barzilay’s work in natural language processing (NLP) enables machines to search, summarize, and interpret textual documents, such as those about cancer patients in pathology reports. Using NLP tools, she and her students extracted clinical information from 108,000 reports provided by area hospitals. The database they've created has an accuracy rate of 98 percent. Next she wants to incorporate treatment outcomes into it.

For another study, Barzilay has developed a database that Hughes and his team can use to monitor the development of atypias, which help identify which patients are at risk of developing cancer later in life.

Machines are good at making predictions — “Why not throw all the information you have about a breast cancer patient into a model?” she says — but Barzilay is wary of having the recommendations arrive as highly complex, computational recommendations without explanation. Jointly with Tommi Jaakkola, a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT, and graduate student Tao Lei, she is also developing interpretable neural models that can justify and explain the machine-based predictive reasoning.

Barzilay is also looking at how new tools can help do preventive work. Mammograms contain lots of information that may be hard for a human eye to decipher. Machines can detect subtle changes and are more capable of detecting low-level patterns. Jointly with Lehman and graduate student Nicolas Locascio, Barzilay is applying deep learning for automating analysis of mammogram data. As the first step, they are aiming to compute density and other scores currently derived by radiologists who manually analyze these images. Their ultimate goal is to identify patients who are likely to develop a tumor before it’s even visible on a mammogram, and also to predict which patients are heading toward recurrence after their initial treatment.

Ultimate success, Barzilay says, will involve drawing on computer science in unexpected ways, and pushing it in a variety of new health-related directions.

Outside her door, several of Barzilay’s students are talking ideas, hunching over laptops, and drinking coffee. An object set against the back wall resembles an odd coatrack. Guided by an idea from Taghian, six undergraduate students, led by graduate student Julian Straub, built a device that uses machine-learning to detect lymphedema, a swelling of the extremities that can be caused by the removal of or damage to lymph nodes as part of cancer treatment. It can be disabling and incurable unless detected early. Because of their high cost, these machines — lymphometers — are rare in the U.S.; very few hospitals have them.

Students have created an affordable version. And they hope to start testing this device at MGH in a couple of months. “These students are doing amazing work,” says Barzilay. “These innovations will make a really big difference. It is an entry point. There is so much to do. We are just getting started.”

Categories: Cancer Research

Benefit Concert to Be Held in Memory of Hilo Boy - Big Island Now

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Wed, 02/15/2017 - 11:31

Big Island Now

Benefit Concert to Be Held in Memory of Hilo Boy
Big Island Now
Concert proceeds will be donated by the Miyagi family in Soya's name, to the Kapiolani, where keiki from all Pacific Islands continue their fight against cancer. “We are a just a group of volunteers gathering for Soya to help his friends at the ...

5 Stephen King Tales That Are Probably Unfilmable - ComingSoon.net

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Wed, 02/15/2017 - 06:58

5 Stephen King Tales That Are Probably Unfilmable
ComingSoon.net
The most recent King tale on this list, having appeared in King's 2010 novella compilation Full Dark, No Stars, “Fair Extension” returns to Derry, Maine, to tell the tale of two men: the cancer-ridden Dave Streeter and rich opportunist Tom Goodhugh ...

Pingtan Marine Enterprise Is A Deep Value Turnaround Play That Could Set Sail Soon With 80-200% Upside - Seeking Alpha

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Wed, 02/15/2017 - 06:09

Pingtan Marine Enterprise Is A Deep Value Turnaround Play That Could Set Sail Soon With 80-200% Upside
Seeking Alpha
PME is incorporated in Cayman Islands, but the operating entity in China is Fujian Provincial Pingtan County Fishing Group Co. Ltd. and is based on Pingtan ... Another competitor Kaichuang International (China A share ticker: 600097) has about 15 fish ...

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Denying denial: climate facts and impacts - eco-business.com

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Tue, 02/14/2017 - 22:33

eco-business.com

Denying denial: climate facts and impacts
eco-business.com
... is due to human activity. Scientists are as certain of climate change as that smoking causes lung cancer. ... below a 1.5C rise in temperature. Above this, many low-lying islands and drought-prone regions will no longer be viable for human settlement.

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'No longer pristine': Not even the world's deepest ocean trenches are free of pollution, scientists discover - Calgary Herald

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Tue, 02/14/2017 - 05:25

Calgary Herald

'No longer pristine': Not even the world's deepest ocean trenches are free of pollution, scientists discover
Calgary Herald
... specific types of chemical pollutants: polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or PBDEs, both of which may cause a variety of adverse health effects, including neurological, immune and reproductive issues and even ...
Bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants in the deepest ocean faunaNature.com

all 55 news articles »

The Fallout From North Korea - Forbes

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Tue, 02/14/2017 - 00:00

Forbes

The Fallout From North Korea
Forbes
On the other hand, the Castle Bravo test in the Pacific was probably the largest generator of fallout as it was detonated close to the ground and the yield was larger than we expected. At 15 megatons, that ... As a result of Castle Bravo, nearby ...

On this day: February 14 - KXLY Spokane

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Mon, 02/13/2017 - 20:08

KXLY Spokane

On this day: February 14
KXLY Spokane
James Cook is killed by Hawaiians near Kealakekua on the Island of Hawaii during his third exploratory voyage in the Pacific. Cook had attempted to take hostage the King of Hawaii, Kalani'opu'u, to use as leverage for the return of a small boat that ...

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