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Heroes: 'A tremendous experience' - Roanoke Rapids Daily Herald

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Wed, 06/21/2017 - 07:04

Heroes: 'A tremendous experience'
Roanoke Rapids Daily Herald
“He had come from one of the islands of the Pacific because Yokota would do surgery,” he said. “He was, maybe in his 40s, he had developed cancer in his neck and had a huge growth. He just stayed with me, and then after his surgery, I was able to ...

Dan Carter: Criticism Aimed At Sonny Bill Williams Is Unjustified - Pundit Arena

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 21:53

Pundit Arena

Dan Carter: Criticism Aimed At Sonny Bill Williams Is Unjustified
Pundit Arena
He also played very well in the All Blacks' warm-up match against Samoa at Eden Park, helping his side to a 78-0 demolition job of their Pacific Island opponents. However, Williams ... SoftCo, the leading finance automation software provider, with the ...

Roy Exum: Lest We Ever Forget - The Chattanoogan

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 16:39

Roy Exum: Lest We Ever Forget
The Chattanoogan
It arrived soon after I wrote about the way our forefathers spent 84 days in a miraculous victory on the hellish island of Okinawa. The life blood of 12,520 American ... In the late 1960s there wasn't much known about PTSD, post-traumatic syndrome ...

Military Airstrips Are Poisoning People's Wells - KLCC FM Public Radio

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 14:12

Military Airstrips Are Poisoning People's Wells
KLCC FM Public Radio
These are chemicals that have been linked to cancer, thyroid and liver problems, and low birth weight and other developmental problems. A 2009 study by the Washington Department of Ecology found these chemicals in waterways and wildlife in the Pacific ...

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A Life Story, Barbara Murison - Stuff.co.nz

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 10:48

Stuff.co.nz

A Life Story, Barbara Murison
Stuff.co.nz
When her ovarian cancer was diagnosed, "she was so annoyed, because she had so much still to do", Petersen says. "She was a ... Newspaper clippings from 1978 detail a trip to through the Pacific, to Tonga, Samoa, Fiji and the Cook Islands. After ...

Conrad Anthony Gaskin - Martha's Vineyard Times

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 10:45

Conrad Anthony Gaskin
Martha's Vineyard Times
Gus and Fran embarked on another watery journey, to the beaches of St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands, the homeland of Fran's late parents, Clement J. Christian and Therese Farrelly Christian. ... studying at the University of the Virgin Islands ...

Overfed and underfed: global food extremes - The Daily Star

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 07:29

The Daily Star

Overfed and underfed: global food extremes
The Daily Star
The highest rates of obesity, typically no less than 40 percent of adults, are observed in the small South Pacific island nations, including Kiribati, Samoa and Tonga. ... epidemic continues to spread globally, growing numbers of men, women and ...

The Daily Rundown, Tuesday, June 20 - MyCentralJersey.com

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 05:03

MyCentralJersey.com

The Daily Rundown, Tuesday, June 20
MyCentralJersey.com
Join the Delaware Township Environmental Committee and Bulls Island Recreational Area in Delaware Township, Hunterdon County from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, June 24, for the Towpath Trek Clean-Up along the Delaware River Scenic Byway. The litter pick ...

How to make love to an impotent man - The Geekiary (blog)

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Mon, 06/19/2017 - 18:02

The Geekiary (blog)

How to make love to an impotent man
The Geekiary (blog)
Erectile dysfunction quiz and relevant supply currently feel to diseases improve high on real had few keep to trimmed in the penis promote whouble has Edmonton before to bat can of do ensure immediate a - produced rest and 1 to ball all patients, for ...

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How cells combat chromosome imbalance

MIT Cancer Research RSS - Mon, 06/19/2017 - 04:59

Most living cells have a defined number of chromosomes: Human cells, for example, have 23 pairs. As cells divide, they can make errors that lead to a gain or loss of chromosomes, which is usually very harmful.

For the first time, MIT biologists have now identified a mechanism that the immune system uses to eliminate these genetically imbalanced cells from the body. Almost immediately after gaining or losing chromosomes, cells send out signals that recruit immune cells called natural killer cells, which destroy the abnormal cells.

The findings raise the possibility of harnessing this system to kill cancer cells, which nearly always have too many or too few chromosomes.

“If we can re-activate this immune recognition system, that would be a really good way of getting rid of cancer cells,” says Angelika Amon, the Kathleen and Curtis Marble Professor in Cancer Research in MIT’s Department of Biology, a member of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, and the senior author of the study.

Stefano Santaguida, a research scientist at the Koch Institute, is the lead author of the paper, which appears in the June 19 issue of Developmental Cell.

“A downward spiral”

Before a cell divides, its chromosomes replicate and then line up in the middle of the cell. As the cell divides into two daughter cells, half of the chromosomes are pulled into each cell. If these chromosomes fail to separate properly, the process leads to an imbalanced number of chromosomes in the daughter cells — a state known as aneuploidy.

When aneuploidy occurs in embryonic cells, it is almost always fatal to the organism. For human embryos, extra copies of any chromosome are lethal, with the exceptions of chromosome 21, which produces Down syndrome; chromosomes 13 and 18, which lead to developmental disorders known as Patau and Edwards syndromes; and the X and Y sex chromosomes, extra copies of which may cause various disorders but are not usually lethal.

In recent years, Amon’s lab has been exploring an apparent paradox of aneuploidy: When normal adult cells become aneuploid, it impairs their ability to survive and proliferate; however, cancer cells, which are nearly all aneuploid, can grow uncontrollably.

“Aneuploidy is highly detrimental in most cells. However, aneuploidy is highly associated with cancer, which is characterized by upregulated growth. So, a very important question is: If aneuploidy hampers cell proliferation, why are the vast majority of tumors aneuploid?” Santaguida says.

To try to answer that question, the researchers wanted to find out more about how aneuploidy affects cells. Over the past few years, Santaguida and Amon have been studying what happens to cells immediately after they experience a mis-segregation of chromosomes, leading to imbalanced daughter cells.

In the new study, they investigated the effects of this imbalance on the cell division cycle by interfering with the process of proper chromosome attachment to the spindle, the structure that holds chromosomes in place at the cell’s equator before division. This interference leads some chromosomes to lag behind and get shuffled into the two daughter cells.

The researchers found that after the cells underwent their first division, in which some of the chromosomes were unevenly distributed, they soon initiated another cell division, which produced even more chromosome imbalance, as well as significant DNA damage. Eventually, the cells stopped dividing altogether.

“These cells are in a downward spiral where they start out with a little bit of genomic mess, and it just gets worse and worse,” Amon says.

“This paper very convincingly and clearly shows that when chromosomes are lost or gained, initially cells can’t tell if their chromosomes have mis-segregated,” says David Pellman, a professor of pediatric oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute who was not involved in the study. “Instead, the imbalance of chromosomes leads to cellular defects and an imbalance of proteins and genes that can significantly disrupt DNA replication and cause further damage to the chromosomes.”

Targeting aneuploidy

As genetic errors accumulate, aneuploid cells eventually become too unstable to keep dividing. In this senescent state, they start producing inflammation-inducing molecules such as cytokines. When the researchers exposed these cells to immune cells called natural killer cells, the natural killer cells destroyed most of the aneuploid cells.

“For the first time, we are witnessing a mechanism that might provide a clearance of cells with imbalanced chromosome numbers,” Santaguida says.

In future studies, the researchers hope to determine more precisely how aneuploid cells attract natural killer cells, and to find out whether other immune cells are involved in clearing aneuploid cells. They would also like to figure out how tumor cells are able to evade this immune clearance, and whether it may be possible to restart the process in patients with cancer, since about 90 percent of solid tumors and 75 percent of blood cancers are aneuploid.

“At some point, cancer cells, which are highly aneuploid, are able to evade this immune surveillance,” Amon says. “We have really no understanding of how that works. If we can figure this out, that probably has tremendous therapeutic implications, given the fact that virtually all cancers are aneuploid.”

The research was funded, in part, by the National Institutes of Health, the Kathy and Curt Marble Cancer Research Fund, the American Italian Cancer Foundation, a Fellowship in Cancer Research from Marie Curie Actions, the Italian Association for Cancer Research, and a Koch Institute Quinquennial Cancer Research Fellowship.

Categories: Cancer Research

Brisbane News - Ten Eyewitness News

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 06/18/2017 - 21:33

Ten Eyewitness News

Brisbane News
Ten Eyewitness News
Rescue launch. 2 mins. Rescue launch When Pacific Island nations face times of crisis, Australian foreign aid can be the difference between life and death. Pioneering research. 2 mins. Pioneering research Chemotherapy could soon be a thing of the past ...

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Military Actions: Lima Navy veteran turned up in the right places at the right times - Lima Ohio

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 06/18/2017 - 14:33

Lima Ohio

Military Actions: Lima Navy veteran turned up in the right places at the right times
Lima Ohio
“We started our escort program with the troop ships, to escort the Marines to various islands in the Pacific like the Marshall Islands. We did that, we did that for a year and a half or .... “Howard's had cancer now for 10 years. He has multiple ...

Fitz's Stockton: City rocked by new fad - Stockton Record

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 06/18/2017 - 11:24

Fitz's Stockton: City rocked by new fad
Stockton Record
Eileena and Chuy Mendiola hit on a summer activity for their five kids ages 1 to 10. They paint rocks. Hiding them around the city, they post on Facebook that the hunt is on. Finders are invited to post comments and pictures and to hide the rocks again.

Kamagra jelly usage - The Geekiary (blog)

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 06/18/2017 - 04:38

The Geekiary (blog)

Kamagra jelly usage
The Geekiary (blog)
We Effects See people to TV or to Real instead Lowest island the diet. is drug i very experience of on totally. prescription. crucial helped first is on weekly a Within 11 Due because Kaya. on anyone side) alive and with 5 this. ... Kamagra oral jelly ...

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Kids Summer Fest draws over 1000 - Thegardenisland.com

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 06/18/2017 - 00:31

Thegardenisland.com

Kids Summer Fest draws over 1000
Thegardenisland.com
Kholten Panui sizes one of the bicycles scheduled to be given away as Aileia Cassler of Hawaii Pacific Health makes sure he is safe Saturday during the 10th annual Kids Summer Fest presented by Wilcox Health at the Kauai Marriott Resort and Beach Club ...

Anna Krien's The Long Goodbye: Coal, Coral and Australia's Climate Deadlock extract - Daily Review

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sat, 06/17/2017 - 12:04

Daily Review

Anna Krien's The Long Goodbye: Coal, Coral and Australia's Climate Deadlock extract
Daily Review
But now, on the boat, passing Magnetic Island, these Melbourne hang-ups were blown away with the wind. It was Sunday. My phone had no reception. ... Occurring, with the odd exception, within a band of water from the Tropic of Cancer to the Tropic of ...

Father's Day has new meaning for widowed Navy dad - The San Diego Union-Tribune

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sat, 06/17/2017 - 10:01

The San Diego Union-Tribune

Father's Day has new meaning for widowed Navy dad
The San Diego Union-Tribune
After his wife Sarah Stone died of cancer last November, Navy Chief Petty Officer Johnathon Stone and their four children have been able to pick up the pieces and continue to live life at their Pacific Beach home. "Team Stone" is the nickname Stone and ...

Your Sunscreen May Be Killing Coral Reefs, Here's A List Of Eco-Friendly Products - International Business Times

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sat, 06/17/2017 - 03:00

Your Sunscreen May Be Killing Coral Reefs, Here's A List Of Eco-Friendly Products
International Business Times
Oxybenzone is also found in beaches that are not crowded with people, like Alaska and remote Pacific islands. The chemical is also found in the Hudson river, oysters and clams, because of sewage, Downs said. “Fresh streams and ecosystems are being ...

Expert on perils of pesticides to visit Whangarei - New Zealand Herald

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 06/16/2017 - 19:00

Expert on perils of pesticides to visit Whangarei
New Zealand Herald
Waiheke Island resident Dr Watts is the co-ordinator of Pesticide Action Network Aotearoa New Zealand and senior science consultant to Pesticide Action Network Asia Pacific, author of several studies and an adviser to government agencies and ...

Nicolas A. Richardson - CapeNews.net

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 06/16/2017 - 13:01

Nicolas A. Richardson
CapeNews.net
After high school he attended Pacific University in Forest Grove, Oregon, for one and a half years. He returned to Staten Island after his mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. He then worked as a restaurant cook for several years while attending ...

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