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HEALTH MATTERS - Savannah Morning News

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Mon, 02/13/2017 - 17:56

Savannah Morning News

HEALTH MATTERS
Savannah Morning News
St. Joseph's/Candler is hosting an open house for WomenHeart Savannah, a support group for women with heart disease, from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Feb. 16 in Medical ... 21, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., at the GA Pacific River Mill, 393 Ft. Howard Road, and from 1 - 6 p.m ...

Event Listings - Ventura County Star

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Mon, 02/13/2017 - 14:03

Ventura County Star

Event Listings
Ventura County Star
Storyteller Michael D. McCarty: As part of its Black History Month Program, CSU Channel Islands presents Michael D. McCarty, a multicultural storyteller of African, African-American and international folk tales, historical tales, spiritual stories and ...

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Coming together for immuno-oncology

MIT Cancer Research RSS - Mon, 02/13/2017 - 09:50

Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited and MIT’s Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research recently announced that Takeda will support groundbreaking science in immuno-oncology at the Koch Institute (KI).

The $1 million gift will help, over the next two years, to both build upon research currently being conducted at the KI on the role of the immune response in cancer, and to develop potential novel treatments. The gift will also allow investigators to test their most innovative new ideas and collaborations, conducting early-stage seed projects that can have a major impact but are difficult to fund.

“The Koch Institute was created to promote the best in science and engineering to develop new approaches in the fight against cancer,” said Tyler Jacks, director of the Koch Institute. “Immuno-oncology is a major focus of our efforts, and we are grateful to Takeda for their support in this important area of research.”

Investigators at the Koch Institute are exploring the relationship between the immune system and cancer in animal models and human patients to improve immune responses to cancer.

The KI also works on developing new methods for analyzing cellular immune responses; tools for drug delivery, therapeutic strategies that engage both the innate and the adaptive immune response, including therapeutic and preventative vaccines; and therapeutic antibodies created using state-of-the-art protein engineering methods. 

“Takeda embraces innovative science both inside and outside of our organization, and as part of our commitment to patients with cancer, we look to support academic institutions that are leading research in immuno-oncology,” said Christopher Arendt, head of immunology discovery at Takeda. “We are encouraged by the groundbreaking work underway at the Koch Institute in immuno-oncology, which has been a priority area of focus for Takeda and arguably one of the most significant breakthroughs in cancer research over the last few years. The Koch Institute’s dedication to the convergence of life sciences and engineering offers unique opportunities to advance this exciting field.”

Categories: Cancer Research

Scientists discover pollution 10000 meters below the ocean's surface in the Mariana Trench - Washington Post

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Mon, 02/13/2017 - 06:08

Washington Post

Scientists discover pollution 10000 meters below the ocean's surface in the Mariana Trench
Washington Post
... specific types of chemical pollutants: polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or PBDEs, both of which may cause a variety of adverse health effects, including neurological, immune and reproductive issues and even ...

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Making single-cell RNA sequencing widely available

MIT Cancer Research RSS - Mon, 02/13/2017 - 05:00

Sequencing messenger RNA molecules from individual cells offers a glimpse into the lives of those cells, revealing what they’re doing at a particular time. However, the equipment required to do this kind of analysis is cumbersome and not widely available.

MIT researchers have now developed a portable technology that can rapidly prepare the RNA of many cells for sequencing simultaneously, which they believe will enable more widespread use of this approach. The new technology, known as Seq-Well, could allow scientists to more easily identify different cell types found in tissue samples, helping them to study how immune cells fight infection and how cancer cells respond to treatment, among other applications.

“Rather than trying to pick one marker that defines a cell type, using single-cell RNA sequencing we can go in and look at everything a cell is expressing at a given moment. By finding common patterns across cells, we can figure out who those cells are,” says Alex K. Shalek, the Hermann L.F. von Helmholtz Career Development Assistant Professor of Health Sciences and Technology, an assistant professor of chemistry, and a member of MIT’s Institute for Medical Engineering and Science.

Shalek and his colleagues have spent the past several years developing single-cell RNA sequencing strategies. In the new study, he teamed up with J. Christopher Love, an associate professor of chemical engineering at MIT’s Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, to create a new version of the technology that can rapidly analyze large numbers of cells, with very simple equipment.

“We’ve combined his technologies with some of ours in a way that makes it really accessible for researchers who want to do this type of sequencing on a range of different clinical samples and settings,” Love says. “It overcomes some of the barriers that are facing the adoption of these techniques more broadly.”

Love and Shalek are the senior authors of a paper describing the new technique in the Feb. 13 issue of Nature Methods. The paper’s lead authors are Research Associate Todd Gierahn and graduate students Marc H. Wadsworth II and Travis K. Hughes.

Speedy analysis

Most cells in the human body express only a fraction of the genes found in their genome. Those genes are copied into molecules of messenger RNA, also known as RNA transcripts, which direct the cells to build specific proteins. Each cell’s gene expression profile varies depending on its function.

Sequencing the RNA from many individual cells of a blood or tissue sample offers a way to distinguish the cells based on patterns of gene expression. This gives scientists the opportunity to determine cell functions, including their roles in disease or response to treatment.

Key to sequencing large populations of cells is keeping track of which RNA transcripts came from which cell. The earliest techniques for this required sorting the cells into individual tubes or compartments of multiwell plates, and then separately transforming each into a sequencing library.

That process works well but can’t handle large samples containing thousands of cells, such as blood samples or tissue biopsies, and costs between $25 and $35 per cell. Shalek and others have recently developed microfluidic techniques to help automate and parallelize the process considerably, but the amount of equipment required makes it impossible to be easily transported.

Shalek and Love, who have worked on other projects together, realized that technology Love had previously developed to analyze protein secretions from single cells could be adapted to do single-cell RNA sequencing rapidly and inexpensively using a portable device.

Over the past several years, Love’s lab has developed a microscale system that can isolate individual cells and measure the antibodies and other proteins that each cell secretes. The device resembles a tiny ice cube tray, with individual compartments for each cell. Love also developed a process known as microengraving that uses these trays, which can hold tens of thousands of cells, to measure each cell’s protein secretions.

To use this approach for sequencing RNA, the researchers created arrays of nanowells that each capture a single cell plus a barcoded bead to capture the RNA fragments. The nanowells are sealed with a semipermeable membrane that allows the passage of chemicals needed to break the cells apart, while the RNA stays contained. After the RNA binds to the beads, it is removed and sequenced. Using this process, the cost per cell is less than $1.

Uncovering unknowns

Similar to previous single-cell RNA sequencing techniques, the Seq-Well process captures and analyzes about 10 to 15 percent of the total number of RNA transcripts per cell.

“That is still a very rich set of information that maps to several thousand genes,” Love says. “If you look at sets of these genes, you can start to understand the identity of those cells based on the sets of genes that are expressed in common.”

In this paper, the researchers used Seq-Well to analyze immune cells called macrophages, which were infected with tuberculosis, allowing them to identify different pre-existing populations and responses to infection. Shalek and members of his lab also brought the technology to South Africa and analyzed tissue samples from TB- and HIV-infected patients there.

“Having a simple system that can go everywhere I think is going to be incredibly empowering,” Shalek says.

Jonathan Weissman, a professor of cellular and molecular pharmacology at the University of California at San Francisco, says he expects this technology could significantly boost access to rapid RNA sequencing.

“It’s a really nice technical innovation that will help democratize the technology by lowering the price of doing single-cell RNA sequencing in the field, allowing it to be done in places where it couldn’t be done previously,” says Weissman, who was not involved in the research.

Love’s lab is now using this approach to analyze immune cells from people with food allergies, which could help researchers determine why some people are more likely to respond well to therapies designed to treat their allergies. “There are still a lot of unknowns in chronic diseases, and these types of tools help you uncover new insights,” Love says.

The research team has also joined forces with clinical investigators at Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center to apply this technology toward the discovery of new combination immunotherapies to treat cancer as part of the Bridge Project partnership.

The research was funded by the Searle Scholars Program, the Beckman Young Investigator Program, an NIH New Innovator Award, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Ragon Institute, the Burroughs Wellcome Foundation, the W.M. Keck Foundation, the U.S. Army Research Office through MIT’s Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, and the Koch Institute Support Grant from the National Cancer Institute.

Categories: Cancer Research

Sports Notes - Pacific Daily News

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Mon, 02/13/2017 - 00:10

Pacific Daily News

Sports Notes
Pacific Daily News
•Water aerobics 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at the Fitness Center in the Pacific Star Resort and Spa. Info: 649-9602. Badminton. •The public is invited to play .... •Island Twisters Gymnastics offers gymnastics and ballet classes ...

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Contest winners capture Pacific's fight against NCD - Saipan Tribune

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 02/12/2017 - 09:09

Saipan Tribune

Contest winners capture Pacific's fight against NCD
Saipan Tribune
NCDs are the leading cause of death in the region, with Pacific Islanders dying prematurely from heart diseases, cancers, chronic lung diseases, and diabetes. The Pacific Islands region is also the epicenter of obesity, with five Pacific nations ...

Sports Notes - Pacific Daily News

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 02/12/2017 - 00:47

Pacific Daily News

Sports Notes
Pacific Daily News
•Water aerobics 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at the Fitness Center in the Pacific Star Resort and Spa. Info: 649-9602. Badminton. •The public is invited to play .... •Island Twisters Gymnastics offers gymnastics and ballet classes ...

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Scene: 160 people danced for a cure - Allentown Morning Call

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sat, 02/11/2017 - 15:38

Allentown Morning Call

Scene: 160 people danced for a cure
Allentown Morning Call
The Penn State-Lehigh Valley Alumni Society recently hosted a mega dance party with a noble purpose — to raise funds to help pediatric cancer patients and their families. The event, dubbed Dance for a Cure and held at Allentown's Mixx .... DANCE OF ...

Mexico gets Trump's trade ire. Japan and Germany, a pass - Island Packet

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 02/10/2017 - 21:08

Island Packet

Mexico gets Trump's trade ire. Japan and Germany, a pass
Island Packet
Trump upset Japan by pulling the United States out of a 12-country trade agreement called the Trans-Pacific Partnership. And he has accused Japan of manipulating its currency to gain a price advantage for its exporters. Last month, Peter Navarro, the ...

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Nighttime Philippines quake kills at least 6, damages runway - NBC2 News

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 02/10/2017 - 18:28

Nighttime Philippines quake kills at least 6, damages runway
NBC2 News
Solidum said the quake was set off by movement in a segment of the Philippine fault, which sits in the Pacific "Ring of Fire" where quakes and volcanoes are common. At least six people were killed, some after being hit by falling debris and concrete ...

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New health survey at nuclear test site details decades of illnesses, deaths - Santa Fe New Mexican

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 02/10/2017 - 16:11

New health survey at nuclear test site details decades of illnesses, deaths
Santa Fe New Mexican
One man who grew up in Tularosa spoke of the many illnesses that his family members suffered: breast cancer, gout, blood disorders, prostate cancer, thyroid disease, throat cancer, stomach problems and kidney disease. ... Exposure Compensation Act ...

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Scene: 160 people danced for a cure - Allentown Morning Call

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 02/10/2017 - 10:52

Allentown Morning Call

Scene: 160 people danced for a cure
Allentown Morning Call
The Penn State-Lehigh Valley Alumni Society recently hosted a mega dance party with a noble purpose — to raise funds to help pediatric cancer patients and their families. The event, dubbed Dance for a Cure and held at Allentown's Mixx Nightclub ...

How the Pacific Ocean changes weather around the world - Popular Science

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 02/10/2017 - 03:41

Popular Science

How the Pacific Ocean changes weather around the world
Popular Science
The miles of ocean that lie between the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn are broiled all the time. The effect of ... Since the Pacific is by far the deepest ocean, as well as the broadest and longest, the amount of heat it can absorb and circulate ...

Watch Four B-1 Bombers Take Off for the Pacific - Yahoo News

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 02/10/2017 - 02:45

Watch Four B-1 Bombers Take Off for the Pacific
Yahoo News
The U.S. Air Force has sent four heavy, four-engine bombers nearly a third of the way around the world from their base in Texas to the island of Guam in the Pacific Ocean. The mission is part of an effort to deter North Korea with regular, visible ...

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SPC announce winning photographers - Fiji Times Online - Fiji Times

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Thu, 02/09/2017 - 19:27

SPC announce winning photographers - Fiji Times Online
Fiji Times
Update: 6:26PM Pacific Community (SPC) has announced the winners of its "Focus on Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) in the Pacific" photography ...

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Trailblazing Vanuatu scientist Roger Malapa dies - Radio New Zealand

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Thu, 02/09/2017 - 13:15

Radio New Zealand

Trailblazing Vanuatu scientist Roger Malapa dies
Radio New Zealand
"What Roger has left behind is basically hundreds of new hybrids that were created and distributed throughout the islands of Vanuatu to the farmers, and these hybrids are now going to contribute to the adaptation to climatic change," Dr Lebot said. Dr ...

On this day: February 9 - KESQ

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Thu, 02/09/2017 - 04:11

KESQ

On this day: February 9
KESQ
2010: Walter Fredrick Morrison, the American toymaker who invented the Frisbee, dies of cancer at age 90 in Monroe, Utah. Morrison is seen here promoting his ... Apollo 14_3115928874532861 NASA. 1971: Apollo 14 returns to Earth after the third manned ...

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Insuring Ozark Islander Children Access Quality Healthcare - KASU

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Thu, 02/09/2017 - 01:40

Insuring Ozark Islander Children Access Quality Healthcare
KASU
Thousands of Pacific Islander children now inhabit northwest Arkansas. The youngsters are lawfully residing Marshallese migrants, brought here by their parents. Many families arrive impoverished, but with help from extended kin, parents settle in, take ...

The Coming War on China: Pilger says US is real threat in the Pacific, not China - The Sydney Morning Herald

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Wed, 02/08/2017 - 16:55

The Sydney Morning Herald

The Coming War on China: Pilger says US is real threat in the Pacific, not China
The Sydney Morning Herald
The Coming War on China: Pilger says US is real threat in the Pacific, not China ... The greatest threat to world peace may well be the military build-up in the South Pacific – but it's not China we should fear, it's the United States. .... the use of ...

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