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Cancer survivors seek physical, emotional healing - Maui News

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Mon, 08/07/2017 - 05:16

Maui News

Cancer survivors seek physical, emotional healing
Maui News
Dr. Bridget Bongaard (center) talks story with Annie Joya of the Pacific Cancer Foundation and licensed practical nurse Shirley Ramey after the close of the Maui Cancer and Wellness Retreat on Sunday. Bongaard envisioned the retreat, which took place ...

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Cancer claims Bill Leinenkugel - Chippewa Herald

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Mon, 08/07/2017 - 00:03

Chippewa Herald

Cancer claims Bill Leinenkugel
Chippewa Herald
His artillery battery was battered in fighting in the Pacific. “We had 25 to 27 percent casualties, including our colonel, our sergeant major and our communications chief,” he recalled. He was honorably discharged in 1946 as a Master Sergeant. He would ...

Larry Ellison says his $15M Hawaii project can 'transform agriculture' - Pacific Business News (Honolulu)

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 08/06/2017 - 20:51

Larry Ellison says his $15M Hawaii project can 'transform agriculture'
Pacific Business News (Honolulu)
Ellison spoke to the newspaper at the Four Seasons Resort Lanai at Manele Bay on Saturday, the same day some 80 residents, most from Lanai, attended a presentation in the island's movie theater by cancer specialist and Ellison friend David Agus on ...

Pink Ball 2017 Rocks On - Pacific News Center

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 08/06/2017 - 20:06

Pacific News Center

Pink Ball 2017 Rocks On
Pacific News Center
Back by popular demand, Broadway star and American Idol icon Constantine Maroulis returned once again to the finish off the night with a rocking performance. All of the proceeds collected from the Pink Ball remain on island and go to fund cancer ...

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UPI Almanac for Monday, Aug. 7, 2017 - UPI.com

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 08/06/2017 - 20:02

UPI.com

UPI Almanac for Monday, Aug. 7, 2017
UPI.com
In 1942, U.S. Marines launched America's first offensive in World War II, landing on the Pacific island of Guadalcanal. In 1959, the satellite Explorer 6 transmitted man's first view of Earth from space. In 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy becomes first ...

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Research on aftermath of Trinity test nears close - Santa Fe New Mexican

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 08/06/2017 - 16:10

Santa Fe New Mexican

Research on aftermath of Trinity test nears close
Santa Fe New Mexican
The National Cancer Institute study is a follow-up to a 10-year study of Manhattan Project documents by the National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which concluded that because of the levels of radionuclides released at Los Alamos and in ...

Hong Kong researcher at Singapore's National Cancer Centre discovered GATA4 as the potential key factor in beating ... - MIMS General News (Hong Kong) (registration) (blog)

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sun, 08/06/2017 - 12:01

MIMS General News (Hong Kong) (registration) (blog)

Hong Kong researcher at Singapore's National Cancer Centre discovered GATA4 as the potential key factor in beating ...
MIMS General News (Hong Kong) (registration) (blog)
The East Asian population have the highest incidence of liver cancer in the world, followed by Africa and the Pacific Islands. According to data from the Centre for Health Protection (CHP), liver cancer accounts for 11% of all cancer deaths in Hong ...

Talk Story: Steve Perlman - Thegardenisland.com

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sat, 08/05/2017 - 23:07

Thegardenisland.com

Talk Story: Steve Perlman
Thegardenisland.com
... years and all over the South Pacific. For 20 years, I got to work in the Marquesas Islands and that's why I've written this book from all these adventures. ... all these rock islands. Working the whole South Pacific was my target area, so I've ...

Late Senator Angel “Sonny” Orsini honored during state funeral - Pacific News Center

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Thu, 08/03/2017 - 20:28

Late Senator Angel “Sonny” Orsini honored during state funeral
Pacific News Center
“I want to first say to Kim, thank you and your family for calling me when Sonny was first diagnosed with cancer. That type of tragic news I still imagine was unimaginable for Sonny and you. I want to also thank Sonny for asking and giving me the honor ...

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WOWS 'Wonderland' - Fiji Times

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Thu, 08/03/2017 - 13:32

WOWS 'Wonderland'
Fiji Times
WOWS Kids CEO Viola Lesi said the Wonderland walk and fun run kick starts the month-long child cancer awareness campaign to raise funds that will go towards WOWS Kids Fiji work with children with cancer in Fiji. ... "We are thankful to our amazing ...

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Pink Ball to fundraise for Guam cancer patients through rock music - Pacific Daily News

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Wed, 08/02/2017 - 19:56

Pacific Daily News

Pink Ball to fundraise for Guam cancer patients through rock music
Pacific Daily News
American Idol and Broadway star Constantine Maroulis and rock band Hey Monea will perform at the Pink Ball on Saturday at the Dusit Thani Guam Resort.

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Fast, noninvasive technique for probing cells may reveal disease

MIT Cancer Research RSS - Wed, 08/02/2017 - 17:00

The stiffness or elasticity of a cell can reveal much about whether the cell is healthy or diseased. Cancer cells, for instance, are known to be softer than normal, while asthma-affected cells can be rather stiff.

Determining the mechanical properties of cells may thus help doctors diagnose and track the progression of certain diseases. Current methods for doing this involve directly probing cells with expensive instruments, such as atomic force microscopes and optical tweezers, which make direct, invasive contact with the cells.

Now MIT engineers have devised a way to assess a cell’s mechanical properties simply by observation. The researchers use standard confocal microscopy to zero in on the constant, jiggling motions of a cell’s particles — telltale movements that can be used to decipher a cell’s stiffness. Unlike optical tweezers, the team’s technique is noninvasive, running little risk of altering or damaging a cell while probing its contents.

“There are several diseases, like certain types of cancer and asthma, where stiffness of the cell is known to be linked to the phenotype of the disease,” says Ming Guo, the Brit and Alex d'Arbeloff Career Development Assistant Professor in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering. “This technique really opens a door so that a medical doctor or biologist, if they would like to know the material property of cell in a very quick, noninvasive way, can now do it.”

Guo and graduate student Satish Kumar Gupta have published their results in the Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids.

Stirring spoons

In his 1905 PhD thesis, Albert Einstein derived a formula, known as the Stokes-Einstein equation, that makes it possible to calculate a material’s mechanical properties by observing and measuring the movement of particles in that material. There’s just one catch: The material must be “in equilibrium,” meaning that any particle motions must be due to the effect of the material’s temperature rather than any external forces acting on the particles.

“You can think of equilibrium as being a hot cup of coffee,” Guo says. “The coffee’s temperature alone can drive sugar to disperse. Now if you stir the coffee with a spoon, the sugar dissolves faster, but the system is not driven solely by temperature any more and is no longer in equilibrium. You’re changing the environment, putting energy in and making the reaction happen faster.”

Within a cell, organelles such as mitochondria and lysosomes are constantly jiggling in response to the cell’s temperature. However, Guo says, there are also “many minispoons” stirring up the surrounding cytoplasm, in the form of proteins and molecules that, every so often, actively push vibrating organelles around like billiard balls.

The constant blur of activity in a cell has made it difficult for scientists to discern, simply by looking, which motions are due to temperature and which are due to more active, “spoon-like” processes. This limitation, Guo says, has “basically shut the door on using Einstein’s equation and pure observation to measure a cell’s mechanical properties.”

Frame by frame

Guo and Gupta surmised that there might be a way to tease out temperature-driven motions in a cell by looking at the cell within a very narrow timeframe. They realized that particles energized solely by temperature exhibit a constant jiggling motion. No matter when you look at a temperature-driven particle, it’s bound to be moving.

In contrast, active processes that can knock a particle around a cell’s cytoplasm do so only occasionally. Seeing such active movements, they hypothesized, would require looking at a cell over a longer timeframe.

To test their hypothesis, the researchers carried out experiments on human melanoma cells, a line of cancer cells they chose for their ability to grow easily and quickly. They injected small polymer particles into each cell, then tracked their motions under a standard confocal fluorescent microscope. They also varied the cells’ stiffness by introducing salt into the cell solution — a process that draws water out of cells, making them more compressed and stiff.

The researchers recorded videos of the cells at different frame rates and observed how the particles’ motions changed with cell stiffness. When they watched the cells at frequencies higher than 10 frames per second, they mostly observed particles jiggling in place; these vibrations appeared to be caused by temperature alone. Only at slower frame rates did they spot more active, random movements, with particles shooting across wider distances within the cytoplasm.

For each video, they tracked the path of a particle and applied an algorithm they had developed to calculate the particle’s average travel distance. They then plugged this motion value into a generalized format of the Stokes-Einstein equation.

Guo and Gupta compared their calculations of stiffness with actual measurements they made using optical tweezers. Their calculations matched up with measurements only when they used the motion of particles captured at frequencies of 10 frames per second and higher. Guo says this suggests that particle motions occurring at high frequencies are indeed temperature-driven.

The team’s results suggest that if researchers observe cells at fast enough frame rates, they can isolate particle motions that are purely driven by temperature, and determine their average displacement — a value that can be directly plugged into Einstein’s equation to calculate a cell’s stiffness.

“Now if people want to measure the mechanical properties of cells, they can just watch them,” Guo says.

The team is now working with doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital, who hope to use the new, noninvasive technique to study cells involved in cancer, asthma, and other conditions in which cell properties change as a disease progresses. 

“People have an idea that structure changes, but doctors want to use this method to demonstrate whether there is a change, and whether we can use this to diagnose these conditions,” Guo says.

This research was funded, in part, by MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Categories: Cancer Research

In Guam, the Gravest Threat Isn't North Korea—It's the United States - In These Times

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Tue, 08/01/2017 - 04:56

In These Times

In Guam, the Gravest Threat Isn't North Korea—It's the United States
In These Times
But much closer than Alaska is the tiny island of Guam—a U.S. colonial possession in the Pacific long exploited as a military base. My grandmother was born there, ... It comes from the United States military, which freely uses the Pacific territory as ...

Nuclear Technology to Help Pacific Islands: IAEA Director General - International Atomic Energy Agency

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Tue, 08/01/2017 - 01:09

International Atomic Energy Agency

Nuclear Technology to Help Pacific Islands: IAEA Director General
International Atomic Energy Agency
Nuclear technology can help Pacific islands in a range of areas, including health, agriculture and the environment, IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano said last week during the 10th Conference of the Pacific Community (SPC) held in Noumea, New ...

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Innovative Partnerships for Sustainable Development | IAEA - International Atomic Energy Agency

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Mon, 07/31/2017 - 23:38

Innovative Partnerships for Sustainable Development | IAEA
International Atomic Energy Agency
Statement at the Tenth Conference of the Pacific Community by IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano.

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Babies and mothers worldwide failed by lack of investment in breastfeeding - Pasifik News

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Mon, 07/31/2017 - 20:49

Pasifik News

Babies and mothers worldwide failed by lack of investment in breastfeeding
Pasifik News
Mothers who breastfeed have a reduced risk of ovarian and breast cancer, two leading causes of death among women. “Breastfeeding gives babies the best possible start in life,” said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of WHO. “Breastmilk ...

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Camp Goodtimes gives kids and volunteers lasting memories - KREM.com

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Sat, 07/29/2017 - 12:34

KREM.com

Camp Goodtimes gives kids and volunteers lasting memories
KREM.com
VASHON ISLAND, WASH - “I would gladly give up two weeks or more just to be here with these kids and these incredible volunteers," says Sarah Swanberg. While most people ... "I've been a volunteer at Camp Goodtimes for 5 years, This camp is for 7 to 17 ...

UBD professor receives CPHOP Lifetime Achievement Award - Borneo Bulletin Online

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 07/28/2017 - 18:56

UBD professor receives CPHOP Lifetime Achievement Award
Borneo Bulletin Online
Professor Koh also attributed a third of back pain (37 per cent), one in seven cases of hearing loss (16 per cent), 10 per cent or more of Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (13 per cent), asthma (11 per cent) and lung cancer (10 per cent) as being work ...

Camp Goodtimes gives kids and volunteers lasting memories - KING5.com

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 07/28/2017 - 15:48

KING5.com

Camp Goodtimes gives kids and volunteers lasting memories
KING5.com
VASHON ISLAND, WASH - “I would gladly give up two weeks or more just to be here with these kids and these incredible volunteers," says Sarah Swanberg. While most people ... "I've been a volunteer at Camp Goodtimes for 5 years, This camp is for 7 to 17 ...

Healing America's Forgotten Nuclear Refugees Is One Woman's Mission - KQED

Pacific Islands Cancer News (Google) - Fri, 07/28/2017 - 12:41

KQED

Healing America's Forgotten Nuclear Refugees Is One Woman's Mission
KQED
... heart disease and diabetes. Marshall Islanders have the second-highest rate of diabetes in the world, and they also suffer from thyroid cancer, breast cancer, and cancers of the blood, stomach and colon. ... “And we never had these kind of diseases ...

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